Track 2: I’m With the Band

In today’s ever-expanding music scene, genres and bands outside of the Top 40 have to think outside the box to be noticed and followed. In the similarly constantly expanding social media world, there are more ways than ever for bands to engage with their audiences. MySpace Music, a medium previously thought dead in today’s day and age, has been shown to have a substantial effect on music sales. In addition to this finding, it’s been discovered that this increase in sales is occurring due to not advertising but through personal messages. The effect has been found to be as much as six times as large as the effect of other forms of communication. This has especially been prominent when the artists at hand are disclosing personal statements about what they’re doing outside of MySpace Music.

Raising Their Voice

There is a growing call for bands to take initiative and reach out to their fans, as their fans are the largest factor determining their overall success. In particular, it is becoming a necessity for bands to find their niche audience and target them on the best platform.

Whether it’s done in an effort to increase attention about a new album or to just humanize the individual members of the bands, audiences have generally positive reactions to the notion of being able to communicate with artists in this way. By using Twitter in particular, bands and artists encourage fans and consumers to respond and react in an immediate way.

Artists in Action

Indie singer Amanda Palmer found personal success through Twitter when she took advantage of the hashtag feature to gain increasing amounts of attention to a tweet that eventually got her a gross of $11,000 on Sharpie designed t-shirts she casually made.

On the other end of the spectrum, social media has made it possible for the audience to provide feedback to individual bands in a way never before easily possible. Through outlets like Facebook and Yelp, consumers have an opportunity to create User Generated Content in order to review artist’s albums, however there is no proof of correlation currently between artist-generated content and reciprocated User Generated Content.

Indie, alternative and start-up bands have been able to utilize all that social media, especially MySpace Music and Twitter, have to offer. While this may not seem necessary after bands have found success or a sponsor with a brand, it is evident that many artists and bands have found benefits in continuing to have an active online social media presence.

 

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2 Comments

  1. I would have never thought of Myspace Music as still relevant today – that is such a unique point to bring up. But, I am a little confused when you bring up the point about bands and personal messages. Readers interested in benefitting from these social media practices would probably like to know who is the band is aiming to reach through these messages (current fans, potential fans, recording artists, etc), and why do personal messages matter so much outside of sales. You could maybe mention that the personal messages not only humanizing the band members but also creates relationships between the band and their fans – in turn increasing the fans’ devotion and support. I also found Amanda Palmer’s example to be interesting and would have loved to learn in more detail about how she had success with hashtags!

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  2. Hey Talia, thanks for your response! My goal was to emphasize that bands can start firsthand and use social media themselves to make direct connections with their followers. By doing this and showing that they are accessible, they are able to grow their fan base and hear direct feedback from their followers. I absolutely appreciate the constructive criticism!

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